A-Methapred

Name: A-Methapred

Uses For A-Methapred

Methylprednisolone injection provides relief for inflamed areas of the body. It is used to treat a number of different conditions, such as inflammation (swelling), severe allergies, adrenal problems, arthritis, asthma, blood or bone marrow problems, eye or vision problems, lupus, skin conditions, kidney problems, ulcerative colitis, and flare-ups of multiple sclerosis. Methylprednisolone is a corticosteroid (cortisone-like medicine or steroid). It works on the immune system to help relieve swelling, redness, itching, and allergic reactions.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using A-Methapred

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of methylprednisolone injection in children. However, pediatric patients are more likely to have slower growth and bone problems if methylprednisolone injection is used for a long time. Recommended doses should not be exceeded, and the patient should be carefully monitored during therapy.

Depo-Medrol® and some strengths of Solu-Medrol® injection should not be used in premature infants. Both brands of methylprednisolone injection contain benzyl alcohol, which may cause serious unwanted effects in premature infants.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of methylprednisolone injection in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have liver, kidney, or heart problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for elderly patients receiving methylprednisolone injection.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category Explanation
All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women.

Breast Feeding

Studies in women suggest that this medication poses minimal risk to the infant when used during breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Desmopressin
  • Rotavirus Vaccine, Live

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Aceclofenac
  • Acemetacin
  • Aldesleukin
  • Amtolmetin Guacil
  • Bemiparin
  • Bromfenac
  • Bufexamac
  • Bupropion
  • Celecoxib
  • Choline Salicylate
  • Clonixin
  • Dexibuprofen
  • Dexketoprofen
  • Diclofenac
  • Diflunisal
  • Dipyrone
  • Droxicam
  • Etodolac
  • Etofenamate
  • Etoricoxib
  • Felbinac
  • Fenoprofen
  • Fepradinol
  • Feprazone
  • Floctafenine
  • Flufenamic Acid
  • Flurbiprofen
  • Ibuprofen
  • Indomethacin
  • Ketoprofen
  • Ketorolac
  • Lornoxicam
  • Loxoprofen
  • Lumiracoxib
  • Meclofenamate
  • Mefenamic Acid
  • Meloxicam
  • Morniflumate
  • Nabumetone
  • Nadroparin
  • Naproxen
  • Nepafenac
  • Niflumic Acid
  • Nimesulide
  • Nimesulide Beta Cyclodextrin
  • Oxaprozin
  • Oxyphenbutazone
  • Parecoxib
  • Phenylbutazone
  • Piketoprofen
  • Piroxicam
  • Pixantrone
  • Pranoprofen
  • Proglumetacin
  • Propyphenazone
  • Proquazone
  • Rofecoxib
  • Salicylic Acid
  • Salsalate
  • Sodium Salicylate
  • Sulindac
  • Telaprevir
  • Tenoxicam
  • Tiaprofenic Acid
  • Tolfenamic Acid
  • Tolmetin
  • Valdecoxib

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Acenocoumarol
  • Alcuronium
  • Aprepitant
  • Aspirin
  • Atracurium
  • Carbamazepine
  • Clarithromycin
  • Cyclosporine
  • Dalfopristin
  • Diltiazem
  • Erythromycin
  • Fluindione
  • Gallamine
  • Hexafluorenium
  • Ketoconazole
  • Licorice
  • Metocurine
  • Mibefradil
  • Nefazodone
  • Phenobarbital
  • Primidone
  • Quinupristin
  • Rifampin
  • Saiboku-To
  • Troleandomycin
  • Warfarin

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Brain injury, traumatic or
  • Cerebral malaria or
  • Fungal infections, systemic or
  • Herpes simplex eye infection, active or
  • Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (low platelet count)—Should not be given to patients with these conditions.
  • Cataracts or
  • Congestive heart failure or
  • Cushing's syndrome (adrenal gland problem) or
  • Depression or
  • Diabetes or
  • Emotional problems or
  • Eye infection or
  • Glaucoma or
  • Heart attack, recent or
  • Heart disease or
  • Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) or
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure) or
  • Liver disease (eg, cirrhosis, hepatitis) or
  • Mental illness or
  • Myasthenia gravis (severe muscle weakness) or
  • Osteoporosis (weak bones) or
  • Stomach or bowel problems (eg, diverticulitis, ulcers, ulcerative colitis) or
  • Thyroid problems or
  • Tuberculosis, inactive—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Infection (bacteria, virus, fungus, parasite, or protozoa)—May decrease your body's ability to fight infection.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else's drugs.
  • Keep a list of all your drugs (prescription, natural products, vitamins, OTC) with you. Give this list to your doctor.
  • Talk with the doctor before starting any new drug, including prescription or OTC, natural products, or vitamins.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Check with your pharmacist about how to throw out unused drugs.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. Check with your pharmacist. If you have any questions about A-methapred, please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this medicine or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about A-methapred. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this medicine. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using A-methapred.

Review Date: October 4, 2017

A-Methapred Dosage

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Methylprednisolone is injected into a muscle or soft tissue, into a skin lesion, into the space around a joint, or into a vein through an IV. A healthcare provider will give you this injection.

If you have major surgery or a severe injury or infection, your methylprednisolone dose needs may change. Make sure any doctor caring for you knows you are using this medicine.

Steroid medication can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection. Call your doctor if you have any signs of infection (fever, chills, body aches).

You should not stop using methylprednisolone suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Follow your doctor's instructions about tapering your dose.

Wear a medical alert tag or carry an ID card stating that you use methylprednisolone. Any medical care provider who treats you should know that you use steroid medication.

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

An overdose of methylprednisolone is not expected to produce life threatening symptoms. However, long term use of high steroid doses can lead to symptoms such as thinning skin, easy bruising, changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your face, neck, back, and waist), increased acne or facial hair, menstrual problems, impotence, or loss of interest in sex.

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose of methylprednisolone.

A-MethaPred Overview

Methylprednisolone is a prescription medication used to treat many conditions including low corticosteroid levels (adrenal insufficiency), certain types of arthritis, allergic conditions, multiple sclerosis, lupus, and other diseases affecting the lungs, skin, eyes, kidneys, blood, thyroid, stomach, and intestines.

Methylprednisolone belongs to a group of drugs called corticosteroids, which replace corticosteroids which the body normally make, or to reduce inflammation that could cause damage to the body.

This medication comes in tablet form and may be taken with or without food.

This medication also comes in an injectable form to be given by a healthcare professional.

Common side effects of methylprednisolone include upset stomach, dizziness, and difficulty falling asleep.  Do not drive or operate machinery until you know how methylprednisolone will affect you.

 

 

Manufacturer

  • Abbott Hospital Products

  • Hospira, Inc.

Side Effects of A-MethaPred

Serious side effects have been reported with prednisone. See “Drug Precautions” section.

Common side effects of prednisone include:

  • dizziness
  • hypertension
  • slow healing
  • retention of fluid resulting in swelling
  • acne
  • electrolyte imbalances
  • decreased immune system function
  • decreased bone density
  • depression
  • inappropriate happiness
  • nausea
  • joint and muscle pain
  • blurred vision
  • headache
  • abnormal distribution of body fat

This is not a complete list of prednisone side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

A-MethaPred Interactions

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you take:

  • cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Restasis, Gengraf)
  • phenobarbital (Donnatal)
  • phenytoin (Dilantin)
  • rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane)
  • ketoconazole (Nizoral)
  • aspirin (Ecotrin)

This is not a complete list of methylprednisolone drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Inform MD

Before taking methylprednisolone, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions. Especially tell your doctor if you:

  • are allergic to methylprednisolone, aspirin (Ecotrin), or any ingredient within this medication product
  • have a history of liver, kidney, intestinal, or heart disease
  • have diabetes, an underactive thyroid gland, high blood pressure, or mental illness
  • have myasthenia gravis (disease of weak muscles), osteoporosis, seizures, or ulcers
  • have or have had tuberculosis or any other type of ongoing infection
  • have a history of ulcers (holes in the stomach)
  • have a history of alcohol use or abuse
  • have are or about to receive a vaccine, especially a live one such as the nasal influenza, MMR, or varicella vaccines
  • are pregnant or breastfeeding

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of methylprednisolone injection in children. However, pediatric patients are more likely to have slower growth and bone problems if methylprednisolone injection is used for a long time. Recommended doses should not be exceeded, and the patient should be carefully monitored during therapy.

Depo-Medrol® and some strengths of Solu-Medrol® injection should not be used in premature infants. Both brands of methylprednisolone injection contain benzyl alcohol, which may cause serious unwanted effects in premature infants.

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