Accretropin

Name: Accretropin

Accretropin Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common
  • Bleeding gums
  • bloating or swelling of the face, arms, hands, ankles, lower legs, or feet
  • burning, numbness, pain, or tingling in all fingers except smallest finger
  • coughing up blood
  • difficulty with breathing or swallowing
  • difficulty with moving
  • dizziness
  • increased menstrual flow or vaginal bleeding
  • muscle pain or stiffness
  • nosebleeds
  • not able to move
  • pain, swelling, or redness in the joints
  • prolonged bleeding from cuts
  • rapid weight gain
  • red or black, tarry stools
  • red or dark brown urine
  • tingling of the hands or feet
  • unusual weight gain or loss
Rare
  • Bleeding, blistering, burning, coldness, discoloration of the skin, feeling of pressure, hives, infection, inflammation, itching, lumps, numbness, pain, rash, redness, scarring, soreness, stinging, swelling, tenderness, tingling, ulceration, or warmth at the injection site
  • blurred vision
  • bone pain
  • change in personality
  • change in the ability to see colors, especially blue or yellow
  • changes in vision
  • chills
  • confusion
  • constipation
  • curved spine
  • darkened urine
  • dry mouth
  • fast heartbeat
  • fever
  • flushed, dry skin
  • fracture
  • fruit-like breath odor
  • headache
  • increased hunger
  • increased thirst
  • increased urination
  • indigestion
  • limp pain in the hip or knee
  • loss of appetite
  • loss of consciousness
  • nausea
  • pains in the stomach, side, or abdomen, possibly radiating to the back
  • problems with walking or talking
  • seizures
  • stomachache
  • sweating
  • troubled breathing
  • tumor
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting
  • weakness
  • yellow eyes or skin

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur:

Symptoms of overdose
  • Backache
  • excessive sweating
  • extreme weakness
  • increase in hands and feet size
  • increased volume of pale, diluted urine
  • pain in extremities
  • stop in menstruation

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common
  • Large, flat, blue, or purplish patches in the skin
  • unusually warm skin
Rare
  • Increased growth of skin lesions
  • swelling of the breasts or breast soreness in both females and males

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Overdose

Acute overdosage could lead initially to hypoglycemia and subsequently to hyperglycemia. Long-term overdosage could result in signs and symptoms of gigantism/acromegaly consistent with the known effects of excess human growth hormone.

Patient information

No information provided. Please refer to the WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS sections.

  • Gattex
  • NutreStore

© Accretropin Patient Information is supplied by Cerner Multum, Inc. and Accretropin Consumer information is supplied by First Databank, Inc., used under license and subject to their respective copyrights.

How should I use Accretropin?

Use Accretropin exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use Accretropin in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your dose of this medicine and how often you give it will depend on what you are being treated for.

Accretropin is given as an injection under the skin. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection. You may be given instructions on how to inject your medicine at home. Do not use this medicine at home if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of needles and syringes used in giving the medicine.

Your doctor or nurse will show you several areas on your body where you can inject Accretropin. Use a different injection place each time you give yourself the shot. Do not inject this medicine into skin that is red, sore, infected, or injured.

Do not shake the Accretropin vial (bottle). Vigorous shaking can ruin the medicine. Use a gentle swirling motion. Do not use the medication if it has changed colors or is cloudy. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

Use each disposable needle only one time. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harm, your blood and growth progress will need to be tested on a regular basis. Your eyes may also need to be checked. It is important that you not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Accretropin should be stored in the refrigerator. Avoid freezing and shaking. Do not use after expiration date stated on the vial and carton labels.

Once opened, Accretropin may be stored up to 14 days when refrigerated. Discard 14 days after first use. Protect from light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the medication as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and use the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Call your doctor if you miss more than 3 doses in a row.

Accretropin side effects

If you have Prader-Willi syndrome, call your doctor promptly if you develop signs of lung or breathing problems such as shortness of breath, coughing, or new or increased snoring. Rare cases of serious breathing problems have occurred in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome who use Accretropin.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • sudden and severe pain or tenderness in your upper stomach;
  • nausea, vomiting, sweating, fever, fast heartbeat, yellowing of the skin or eyes;
  • increased thirst and urination;
  • sudden and severe pain behind your eyes, vision changes;
  • swelling in your head, face, hands, or feet; or
  • numbness or tingling in your wrist, hand, or fingers.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • headache;
  • redness, soreness, swelling, skin rash, itching, pain, or bruising where the medicine was injected;
  • breast swelling;
  • joint pain, swelling, or stiffness; or
  • mild nausea, stomach pain, gas.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect.

What other drugs will affect Accretropin?

Before using Accretropin, tell your doctor if you use insulin or take oral (by mouth) medicine to treat diabetes. Accretropin may affect blood sugar levels and you may need to adjust your dose of the diabetes medication. Oral diabetes medicines include acetohexamide (Dymelor), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glimepiride (Amaryl), glipizide (Glucotrol), glyburide (Diabeta, Micronase), tolazamide (Tolinase), and tolbutamide (Orinase). Do not change the dose of your diabetes medication without your doctor's advice.

Tell your doctor if you use any type of steroid medicine such as cortisone (Cortef, Cortone), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone), prednisolone (Prelone, Pediapred), and dexamethasone (Decadron). Steroids can make Accretropin less effective and your doses may need to be adjusted. Do not stop using a steroid suddenly. Follow your doctor's instructions.

This is not a complete list and there may be other drugs that can interact with Accretropin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Turner's Syndrome

Up to 0.067 mg/kg subcutaneously once a day

Comments:
-Generally, a dose of 0.375 mg/kg body weight per week is recommended.
-The weekly dose should be divided over 6 or 7 days of subcutaneous injections.
-Individualize dosage and administration schedule based on the growth response.
-Serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels may be useful during dose titration.
-Response to therapy in pediatric patients tends to decrease with time, however, failure to increase height velocity, particularly during the first year of treatment, should prompt close assessment of compliance and evaluation of other causes of poor growth, such as hypothyroidism, under-nutrition, advanced bone age, and antibodies to recombinant human growth hormone.
-Treatment for short stature should be discontinued when the epiphyses are fused.

Use: Treatment of short stature associated with Turner Syndrome (TS).

Usual Pediatric Dose for Idiopathic Short Stature

Up to 0.053 mg/kg subcutaneously once a day

Comments:
-Generally, a dose of up to 0.47 mg/kg body weight per week is recommended.
-The weekly dose should be divided over 6 or 7 days of subcutaneous injections.
-Individualize dosage and administration schedule based on the growth response.
-Serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels may be useful during dose titration.
-Response to therapy in pediatric patients tends to decrease with time, however, failure to increase height velocity, particularly during the first year of treatment, should prompt close assessment of compliance and evaluation of other causes of poor growth, such as hypothyroidism, under-nutrition, advanced bone age, and antibodies to recombinant human growth hormone.
-Treatment for short stature should be discontinued when the epiphyses are fused.

Use: Treatment of idiopathic short stature (ISS), also called non-GHD short stature, defined by height SDS lower than -2.25, and associated with growth rates unlikely to permit attainment of adult height in the normal range, in pediatric patients whose epiphyses are not closed and for whom diagnostic evaluation excludes other causes associated with short stature that should be observed or treated by other means.

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