Dilocaine

Name: Dilocaine

Dilocaine Precautions

Topical:

Serious side effects have been reported with topical lidocaine including the following:

Allergic reactions. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms of an allergic reaction.

  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • Hives or skin rash
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Fast breathing
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Confusion
  • Weakness
  • Fainting
  • Seizures or convulsions

Injectable:

Serious side effects have been reported with injectable lidocaine including the following:

Allergic reactions. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms of an allergic reaction.

  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • Hives or skin rash
  • Fast pulse
  • Fast breathing
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Confusion
  • Weakness
  • Fainting
  • Seizures or convulsions

Injectable lidocaine may also affect the central nervous system, including lightheadedness, nervousness, blurred or double vision, altered sensations, and changes in respiration.

Injectable lidocaine may also affect the cardiovascular system, including changes in heartbeat, decreased blood pressure, and cardiac arrest.

Lidocaine can cause drowsiness and dizziness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how lidocaine affects you.

Do not take lidocaine if you:

  • are allergic to lidocaine or to any of its ingredients
  • are allergic to other local anesthetics, including bupivacaine (Marcaine), etidocaine (Duranest), mepivacaine (Carbocaine, Prolocaine), or prilocaine (Citanest)

Additionally, do not take injectable lidocaine if you:

  • have Stokes-Adams syndrome or Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome
  • have sinoatrial, atrioventricular, or intraventricular block

Dilocaine and Lactation

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

It is not known if lidocaine crosses into human milk. Because many medications can cross into human milk and because of the possibility for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants with use of this medication, a choice should be made whether to stop nursing or stop the use of this medication. Your doctor and you will decide if the benefits outweigh the risk of using lidocaine.

Dilocaine Usage

Use lidocaine exactly as prescribed.

This medication comes in several topical forms, including a transdermal patch, ointment, cream, and oral solution. The dose and frequency of use of lidocaine will depend on the condition being treated.

This medication is also available in an injectable form to be given directly into a vein (IV) or for infiltration and nerve block by a healthcare professional.

If you miss a dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the regular time. Do not take two doses of lidocaine at the same time.

 

Dilocaine Dosage

Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully. The dose and frequency of use of lidocaine will depend on the condition being treated or the procedure you will undergo.

 

The dose your doctor recommends may be based on the following:

  • other medical conditions you have
  • other medications you are taking
  • how you respond to this medication

 

Do not use topical forms of lidocaine on broken or blistered skin.

Do not swallow the oral solution of lidocaine. Swish and/or gargle in your mouth and/or throat and spit out the solution.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving Dilocaine (lidocaine injection)?

You should not receive this medicine if you are allergic to lidocaine injection or any other type of numbing medicine, or if you have:

  • severe heart block;

  • a heart rhythm disorder called Stokes-Adams syndrome (sudden slow heart beats that can cause you to faint); or

  • a heart rhythm disorder called Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome (sudden fast heartbeats that can cause you to faint or become easily tired).

To make sure lidocaine injection is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • an allergy to corn products;

  • liver disease;

  • kidney disease;

  • heart disease (unless you are being treated with lidocaine injection for a heart condition);

  • coronary artery disease, circulation problems; or

  • a history of malignant hyperthermia.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant.

Lidocaine can pass into breast milk, but effects on the nursing baby are not known. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.

How is Dilocaine (lidocaine injection)given?

A healthcare provider will give you this injection.

Lidocaine injection is injected into a vein through an IV to treat heart rhythm problems.

When used as a numbing medicine, lidocaine injection is injected through the skin directly into the body area to be numbed.

Your breathing, blood pressure, oxygen levels, and other vital signs will be watched closely while you are receiving lidocaine injection in a hospital setting.

If you are being treated for irregular heart rhythm, your heart rate will be constantly monitored using an electrocardiograph or ECG (sometimes called an EKG). This will help your doctor determine how long to treat you with lidocaine injection.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since lidocaine injection is used only when needed in a clinical setting, you are not likely to miss a dose.

For the Consumer

Applies to lidocaine: intradermal powder

Along with its needed effects, lidocaine (the active ingredient contained in Dilocaine) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking lidocaine:

More common
  • Flushing or redness of the skin
  • itching skin
  • small red or purple spots on the skin
  • unusually warm skin
Less common
  • Bruising, bleeding, burning, swelling, or pain at the application site

Some side effects of lidocaine may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common
  • Nausea
  • vomiting

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