Minitran transdermal

Name: Minitran transdermal

What happens if I miss a dose?

Apply a patch as soon as you remember, and keep it on for the rest of your wearing time without changing your patch removal schedule. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra patches to make up the missed dose.

Precautions

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to similar drugs (such as isosorbide mononitrate); or to nitrites; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: recent head injury, anemia, low blood pressure, loss of too much body water (dehydration), other heart problems (such as recent heart attack).

This drug may make you dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Limit alcoholic beverages.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

If you are going to have an MRI test, tell testing personnel that you are using this patch. Some patches may contain metals that can cause serious burns during an MRI. Ask your doctor whether you will need to remove your patch before the test and apply a new patch afterward, and how to do so properly.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this medication, especially dizziness and lightheadedness, which could increase the risk of falls.

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

It is not known whether this drug passes into breast milk or if it may harm a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Overdose

This medication patch may be harmful if chewed or swallowed. If someone has overdosed, remove the patch if possible. For serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: slow heartbeat, vision changes, severe nausea/vomiting, sweating, cold/clammy skin, bluish fingers/toes/lips.

Notes

Do not share this medication with others.

Laboratory and/or medical tests (such as blood pressure monitoring) should be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details.

Lifestyle changes such as dietary changes, exercise, and stopping smoking may help this drug work better. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about lifestyle changes that might benefit you.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, apply it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip themissed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Storage

Store at room temperature between 68-77 degrees F (20-25 degrees C) away from light and moisture. Brief storage between 59-86 degrees F (15-30 degrees C) is permitted. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medicines away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed (See How to Use section).Information last revised July 2016. Copyright(c) 2016 First Databank, Inc.

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to nitroglycerin: buccal tablet extended release, intravenous solution, oral capsule extended release, rectal ointment, sublingual powder, sublingual spray, sublingual tablet, transdermal film extended release, transdermal ointment

General

The most common side effect is headache.[Ref]

Nervous system

Very common (10% or more): Headache (up to 64%)
Common (1% to 10%): Dizziness, lightheadedness, syncope, vertigo, drowsiness
Rare (0.1% to 0.01%): Severe and prolonged headache
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Cerebral ischemia
Frequency not reported: Faintness, somnolence[Ref]

Cardiovascular

Common (1% to 10%): Hypotension, angina increased, paradoxical bradycardia, tachycardia, orthostatic hypotension, blood pressure decreased, facial flushing
Uncommon (0.1 to 1%): Circulatory collapse
Rare (less than 0.1%): Bradycardia, cyanosis, flushing, heart rate increase
Frequency not reported: Crescendo angina, rebound hypertension, palpitations, hypertension, decreased arterial oxygen tension, severe arterial hypotension with bradycardia, transient flushing[Ref]

Gastrointestinal

Common (1% to 10%): Nausea, vomiting
Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Dry mouth
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Heartburn, halitosis
Frequency not reported: Abdominal pain, retching, lip and tongue swelling[Ref]

Dermatologic

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Dermatitis contact, erythema, pruritus, burning, irritation, eczema, urticaria
Rare (0.01 to 0.1%): Allergic skin reactions, rash
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Exfoliative dermatitis, drug rash
Frequency not reported: Cutaneous flushing, diaphoresis, angioedema
Postmarketing reports: Rash generalized[Ref]

Other

Common (1% to 10%): Asthenia, weakness
Frequency not reported: Retrosternal discomfort[Ref]

Hypersensitivity

Rare (less than 0.1%): Hypersensitivity reactions, anaphylaxis
Frequency not reported: Allergic reaction, anaphylactoid reaction[Ref]

Psychiatric

Common (1% to 10%): Restlessness
Frequency not reported: Apprehension[Ref]

Respiratory

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Impairment of respiration
Frequency not reported: Hypoxemia, dyspnea[Ref]

Hematologic

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Methemoglobinemia[Ref]

Ocular

Rare (less than 0.1%): Blurred vision
Frequency not reported: Increased ocular pressure[Ref]

Musculoskeletal

Frequency not reported: Muscle twitching[Ref]

Some side effects of Minitran may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.

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