Senatec

Name: Senatec

Senatec Overview

Lidocaine is a prescription medication used to prevent pain before procedures or to relieve pain due to certain conditions. Lidocaine belongs to a group of drugs called local anesthetics. These stop nerves from sending pain signals to the brain.

This medication comes in several topical forms, including a patch to be applied to the skin (transdermal), ointment, cream, and oral solution. Lidocaine is an ingredient in some over-the-counter topical pain relievers. This page refers to the prescription forms of lidocaine.

This medication is also available in an injectable form to be given directly into a vein (IV) or for infiltration and nerve block by a healthcare professional.

Common side effects of topical lidocaine include irritation at site of application. Common side effects of injectable lidocaine include confusion, nervousness, and numbness. Lidocaine may also cause dizziness and drowsiness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how this medication affects you. 

Senatec Drug Class

Senatec is part of the drug classes:

  • Amides

  • Analgesics and anesthetics

  • Anesthetics for topical use

  • Anesthetics, local

  • Antiarrhythmics, class Ib

Senatec Interactions

Tell your doctor about all of the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you take:

  • disopyramide (Norpace)
  • flecainide (Tambocor)
  • medications applied to the skin or mouth to treat pain
  • mexiletine (Mexitil)
  • moricizine (Ethmozine)
  • procainamide (Procanabid, Pronestyl)
  • propafenone (Rhythmol)
  • quinidine (Quinidex)
  • tocainide (Tonocard)

This is not a complete list of lidocaine drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Senatec and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

The FDA categorizes medications based on safety for use during pregnancy. Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.

Lidocaine falls into category B.

There are no well-done studies that have been done in humans with lidocaine. In animal studies, pregnant animals were given this medication, and the babies did not show any medical issues related to this medication.

Senatec and Lactation

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

It is not known if lidocaine crosses into human milk. Because many medications can cross into human milk and because of the possibility for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants with use of this medication, a choice should be made whether to stop nursing or stop the use of this medication. Your doctor and you will decide if the benefits outweigh the risk of using lidocaine.

Senatec Usage

Use lidocaine exactly as prescribed.

This medication comes in several topical forms, including a transdermal patch, ointment, cream, and oral solution. The dose and frequency of use of lidocaine will depend on the condition being treated.

This medication is also available in an injectable form to be given directly into a vein (IV) or for infiltration and nerve block by a healthcare professional.

If you miss a dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the regular time. Do not take two doses of lidocaine at the same time.

 

Senatec Overdose

If you take too much lidocaine, call your healthcare provider or local Poison Control Center, or seek emergency medical attention right away.

If lidocaine is administered by a healthcare provider in a medical setting, it is unlikely that an overdose will occur. However, if overdose is suspected, seek emergency medical attention.

Other Requirements

Store lidocaine at room temperature.

Keep this and all medicines out of the reach of children.

(web3)